Meet Mycroft – World’s 1st Open Source Artificial Intelligence Based on Linux, Raspberry Pi and Arduino

Short Bytes: Using the Internet of Things we will control our future lives by inculcating electronics and internet in each and every small thing around us. Now take the Internet of Things + cloud in one hand and pick up the power of artificial intelligence + open source in the other, and mix these two. This is how Mycroft was born – an artificially intelligent and open source internet of things platform.

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Artificial Intelligence Is Coming to IT, VMware CEO Says

Artificial intelligence will characterize the next major wave of IT innovation, according to Pat Gelsinger, CEO of VMware.

It was the concluding point of his Tuesday keynote at VMworld, which focused on the changing nature of the enterprise. As business becomes increasingly digital, mobile, and cloud-based, the way we run businesses ought to change as well, he said.

Those changes are happening already, but in the background, he sees AI starting to make its presence known. It’s true AI has been “on the way” for decades. But Gelsinger believes its time is finally imminent, and he’s not alone; he recounted a recent conversation with Stanford University President John Hennessey, who believes AI is the most important upcoming wave of technology.

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The next phase in Artificial Intelligence: Singularity

Max Spindle @compdealernews

I love good science fiction because there is always a glimpse of a thought, an idea that ultimately becomes something tangible in our world.

But Elon Musk’s (Tesla, SpaceX) and Stephen Hawking’s warning about perfecting AI (artificial intelligence) could lead us to create a demon we can’t control made me wonder if it isn’t already too late.

We’re already struggling to understand and manage AI

AI is only one of our technological advances that will lead to Google’s Raymond Kurzweil’s favorite subject, Singularity.

Kurzweil is also one of the founders of six-year-old Singularity University and his goal is to live 700 years +/-.

Actually, the way technology is rushing, he could live a helluva’ lot longer … just not in his present form.

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Will Artificial Intelligence Kill Content Marketing?

Will Artificial Intelligence Kill Content Marketing?

Photo by Flickr

“Humans, who are limited by slow biological evolution, couldn’t compete and would be superseded [by artificial intelligence].”

– Professor Stephen Hawking, University of Cambridge

These words from renowned physicist Stephen Hawking, as well as the impending presidential campaign of self-proclaimed “transhumanist” Zoltan Istvan, paint quite an exciting picture regarding the future role of artificial intelligence (AI) in everyday life. After all, Istvan’s idea of integrated immortality via the growth of AI being just within reach of humanity’s grasp is definitely a topic that stirs up quite a bit of controversy and discussion among experts and casual friends alike.

However, the notion of this virtual force assuming direct control of certain societal functions isn’t just limited to fascinating conversations and hypotheticals found in the distant future. In fact, certain members of the content marketing community feel that this reality is right around the corner for a human-driven industry that views itself as both vibrant and irreplaceable. With this in mind, let’s take a look at the future relationship between content marketing and AI, as well as what this development could mean for content marketers like yourself moving forward.

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Don’t Worry, Smart Machines Will Take Us With Them

Why human intelligence and AI will co-evolve.

When it comes to artificial intelligence, we may all be suffering from the fallacy of availability: thinking that creating intelligence is much easier than it is, because we see examples all around us. In a recent poll, machine intelligence experts predicted that computers would gain human-level ability around the year 2050, and superhuman ability less than 30 years after.1 But, like a tribe on a tropical island littered with World War II debris imagining that the manufacture of aluminum propellers or steel casings would be within their power, our confidence is probably inflated.

AI can be thought of as a search problem over an effectively infinite, high-dimensional landscape of possible programs. Nature solved this search problem by brute force, effectively performing a huge computation involving trillions of evolving agents of varying information processing capability in a complex environment (the Earth). It took billions of years to go from the first tiny DNA replicators toHomo Sapiens. What evolution accomplished required tremendous resources. While silicon-based technologies are increasingly capable of simulating a mammalian or even human brain, we have little idea of how to find the tiny subset of all possible programs running on this hardware that would exhibit intelligent behavior.

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Asking the Experts: Artificial Intelligence Leaders Answer AI’s Most Burning Questions (Part I)

What if you could get a few of the top minds in artificial intelligence and pick their brain?

Fun idea, right?

I’m lucky enough to explore the bigger AI questions over dinner with friends and with my colleagues at work, but those views don’t necessarily get shared – and there’s a lot of noise when it comes to this exciting technology.

So, I decided to tap my AI peers for their expert views on the top questions around AI to help provide a more balanced view from the AI community:

Adam Cheyer, Co-founder of Viv, formerly Co-founder of Siri
David Ackley, Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of New Mexico
Dr. Dileep George, Co-founder of Vicarious

In part I of this two-part article, we’ll dive into some personal a-ha moments related to AI research, the surprises and discoveries around the technology as well as exploring the most unusual use cases when it comes to AI.

Here goes!

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Artificial Intelligence Can Now Paint Like Art’s Greatest Masters

Some of the paintings you see above were painted by some of the most renowned artists in human history. The others were made by an artificial intelligence.

Robotic brains have a ways to go before they match the masters in terms of pure creativity, but it seems they’ve gotten quite good at mimicking and remixing what they see. In a study published late last week by researchers from the University of Tubingen in Germany, researchers described an artificial intelligence neural network capable of lifting the “style” of an image and using that style to copy another image, which is why you see these waterfront houses look as though they were painted by Picasso, van Gogh, or Munch.

As you might expect, the math is quite complex, but the basic idea is pretty simple. As the researchers explain, computers are getting very good at image recognition and reproduction. The neural network basically does two jobs, then: One layer analyzes the content of an image, while another analyzes its texture, or style. These functions can also be split to work across two images.

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Georgia Tech Uses Artificial Intelligence to Crowdsource Interactive Fiction

Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have developed a new artificially intelligent system that crowdsources plots for interactive stories, which are popular in video games and let players choose different branching story options.

A new Georgia Tech artificial intelligence system develops interactive stories through crowdsourced data for more robust fiction. Here, the AI replicates a typical first date to the movies (user choices are in red), complete with loud theater talkers and the arm-over-shoulder movie move.

With potentially limitless crowdsourced plot points, the system could allow for more creative stories and an easier method for interactive narrative generation. Current AI models for games have a limited number of scenarios, no matter what a player chooses. They depend on a dataset already programmed into a model by experts.

Using the Georgia Tech approach, one might imagine a Star Wars game using online fan fiction to let the AI system generate countless paths for a player to take.

“Our open interactive narrative system learns genre models from crowdsourced example stories so that the player can perform different actions and still receive a coherent story experience,” says Mark Riedl, lead investigator and associate professor of interactive computing at Georgia Tech.

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Fight Air Pollution in China

IBM is testing a new way to alleviate Beijing’s choking air pollution with the help of artificial intelligence. The Chinese capital, like many other cities across the country, is surrounded by factories, many fueled by coal, that emit harmful particulates. But pollution levels can vary depending on factors such as industrial activity, traffic congestion, and weather conditions.

The IBM researchers are testing a computer system capable of learning to predict the severity of air pollution in different parts of the city several days in advance by combining large quantities of data from several different models—an extremely complex computational challenge. The system could eventually offer specific recommendations on how to reduce pollution to an acceptable level—for example, by closing certain factories or temporarily restricting the number of drivers on the road. A comparable system is also being developed for a city in the Hebei province, a badly affected area in the north of the country.

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